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Lonely Hearts Hotel by Heather O'Neill Set in Montreal and New York between the wars, a spellbinding story about two orphans whose unusual magnetism and talent allow them to imagine a sensational future, from the bestselling, two-time Scotiabank Giller Prize-shortlisted author.
The Age of Anger by Pankaj Mishra One of our most important public intellectuals reveals the hidden history of our current global crisis
Insane Clown President by Matt Taibbi In twenty-five pieces from Rolling Stone—plus two original essays—Matt Taibbi tells the story of Western civilization’s very own train wreck, from its tragicomic beginnings to its apocalyptic conclusion.
The Evenings by Gerard Reve THE FIRST ENGLISH TRANSLATION OF A POSTWAR MASTERPIECE 'I work in an office. I take cards out of a file. Once I have taken them out, I put them back in again. That is it.'
The Strays by Emily Bitto For readers of Atonement, a hauntingly powerful story about the fierce friendship between three sisters and their friend as they grow up on the outskirts of their parents' wild and bohemian artistic lives.

Perfect Books

Following his blockbuster biography of Steve Jobs, Walter Isaacson’s New York Times bestselling and critically acclaimed The Innovators is a “riveting, propulsive, and at times deeply moving” (The Atlantic) story of the people who created the computer and the Internet.

What were the talents that allowed certain inventors and entrepreneurs to turn their visionary ideas into disruptive realities? What led to their creative leaps? Why did some succeed and others fail?

The Innovators is a masterly saga of collaborative genius destined to be the standard history of the digital revolution—and an indispensable guide to how innovation really happens. Isaacson begins the adventure with Ada Lovelace, Lord Byron’s daughter, who pioneered computer programming in the 1840s. He explores the fascinating personalities that created our current digital revolution, such as Vannevar Bush, Alan Turing, John von Neumann, J.C.R. Licklider, Doug Engelbart, Robert Noyce, Bill Gates, Steve Wozniak, Steve Jobs, Tim Berners-Lee, and Larry Page.

This is the story of how their minds worked and what made them so inventive. It’s also a narrative of how their ability to collaborate and master the art of teamwork made them even more creative. For an era that seeks to foster innovation, creativity, and teamwork, The Innovators is “a sweeping and surprisingly tenderhearted history of the digital age” (The New York Times).

Perfect Books

In Arms: The Culture and Credo of the Gun, novelist, sports shooter
and former army reservist A.J. Somerset offers up one of the first
looks at the gun as the pre-eminent cultural symbol of power in
North America and asks how it got that way. Touring through the
various cultural battlefields of 19th- and 20th-century Canada and
the United States, including film, literature, music, video games,
and history, Somerset charts how the gun went from a tool in the
hands of the earliest North American pioneers, used to defend the
homestead and put food on the table, to a kind of totem, instantly
capable of dividing communities. Sharp-eyed and ascerbic, surehanded
and sportive, Arms presents an intellectual and cultural
history that is certain to enrage, entertain and provoke debate,
while showing that the gun cultures of Canada and the United
States may not be so different after all. If guns, as the NRA often
exclaims, do not kill people, Somerset shows how it is that the idea
of the gun has become one many have believed worth dying for.

Perfect Books

On a summer morning in Sarajevo a hundred years ago, a teenager named Gavrilo Princip took a pistol out of his pocket and fired the opening rounds of the First World War. By killing Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the Austro-Hungarian Empire, Gavrilo Princip started a cycle of events that would change the world forever. Retracing Princip's steps from the feudal frontier village of his birth to the great plain city of Belgrade and ultimately Sarajevo, journalist and bestselling author Tim Butcher makes discoveries about the assassin that have eluded historians for a hundred years. Drawing on his own experiences in the Balkans as a war reporter during the 1990s, he also unravels this complex part of the world and its conflicts, showing how the events that were sparked that day in June 1914 still have influence today. Part travelogue, part reportage, and part history, The Trigger is a rich and timely work about one of history's most crucial and least-understood characters.

Perfect Books

This compelling narrative goes behind the scenes with important living artists around the world to humanize and demystify contemporary art.

When people think of contemporary art they often think of the market: eye-popping prices for splashy works. But Sarah Thornton argues that, for artists, the key marker
of success isn’t money but credibility. 33 Artists in 3 Acts explores the strategies deployed by artists from international superstars to unheralded teachers. Thornton
challenges the romantic vision of the lone artist, showing how these driven, inventive personalities interact with professional and intellectual networks of supporters,
collaborators, and assistants. Drawing from interviews with 130 artists on four continents, Thornton crafts a brilliantly structured narrative that reveals the dynamicsof creative lives.

Perfect Books

From the renowned and bestselling author of A History of God, a sweeping exploration of religion's connection to violence.

     In these troubled times, we risk basing decisions of real and dangerous consequence on mistaken understandings of the faiths subscribed around us, in our immediate community as well as globally. And so, with her deep learning and sympathetic understanding, Karen Armstrong examines the impulse toward violence in each of the world's great religions. The comparative approach is new: while there have been plenty of books on jihad or the Crusades, this book lays the Christian and the Islamic way of war side by side, along with those of Buddhism, Hinduism, Confucianism, Daoism and Judaism. Each of these faiths arose in agrarian societies with plenty of motivation for violence: landowners had to lord it over peasants and warfare was essential to increase one's landholdings, the only real source of wealth before the great age of trade and commerce. In each context, it fell to the priestly class to legitimize the actions of the state. And so the martial ethos became bound up with the sacred. At the same time, however, their ideologies developed that ran counter to the warrior code: around sages, prophets and mystics. Within each tradition there grew up communities that represented a protest against the injustice and violence endemic to agrarian society. This book explores the symbiosis of these two impulses and its development as these confessional faiths came of age. The aggression of secularism has often damaged religion and pushed it into a violent mode. But modernity has also been spectacularly violent, and so Armstrong goes on to show how and in what measure religions, in their relative maturity, came to absorb modern belligerence--and what hope there might be for peace among believers in our time.

Perfect Books

Subcategories

New in Paper

Unbroken Furiously
Hidden Figures Nightfall

News and Events

Wednesday, February 22nd - Dennis McConaghy

 Join us on Wednesday, February 22nd  as we welcome Dennis McConaghy and his new book Dysfunction

Dennis will be in the store from 7 to 9p.m. to discuss the book and sign copies.

Canada Reads

Perfect Books has a good supply of all five titles but they disappear quickly. Call or email to reserve your copies. Check out the shortlist here.


 


 

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